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wafuku - noun: traditional Japanese clothing

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Kimono Information 10

Videos and Links To Pages Showing How To Wear Kimonos & Tie Obis



Information Pages
1 About Kimonos
2 Japanese Womenswear
3 Japanese Menswear
4 Further Kimono Information
5 Wearing and Folding Women's Japanese Garments - Including Video
6 Types of Women's Kimono. Geisha & Maiko
7 Japanese Eras (Periods)
8 Uses for Japanese Kimono Fabrics
9 Shibori and Tsujigahana Patterning Techniques - Including Video
10 Lots of Great Links To How To Wear Kimonos & Tie Obis
11 Types of Obi
12 Types of Kimonos - Picture Reference
13 Haori Kimono Jackets - Japan's secret treasure
14 Traditional Japanese Footwear (on my blog)
15 My Wafuku Blog, with lots of information and random other things of interest

There is also a lot of information on my Wafuku blog. This link opens in a new window, leaving this window open

I also have furoshiki tying instructions here

You can see photos of the kimono that started wafuku.co.uk here


How to put on a yukata kimono and hanhaba (half breadth) obi. All kimonos are length adjusted this way, it's not just for yukata kimonos
It is a Youtube video, in two parts. If you only want the hanhaba obi instructions, they are in Part 2.

Putting on a yukata & hanhaba obi - Part 1

Putting on a yukata & hanhaba obi - Part 2

How to put on a nagoya obi.
Below is a video (in two parts) with a lesson in how to put on a nagoya obi. Nagoya obi have the sash section already folded in half and the rear knot section at full width.

The woman in the video is wearing her kimono, with the fold over tied at the waist, to adjust length, and is wearing a (pink) date-jime obi plus an obi ita(stiffening board) round her waist . Her (white) obi ita has an elastic strap round the back, most have no strap and are just held in place by the obi. She puts the nagoya obi on top of those.

You can also get pre-shaped, two part nagoya obi, which do away with all the time consuming, complicated tying, but look the same once on. If you visit this site's obi section, you can see all kinds of obis, including nagoya and pre-shaped, two part obis

The makura (pillow) she mentions is an obi bustle pad, which pads out the top of the rear knot and is hidden inside the knot, covered by an obiage. The obiage is a scarf-like tie that goes around the top of the obi sash and is tied at the front, then partially tucked under the sash. Around the middle, to help hold the obi in place, is a cord called an obijime, also tied at the front.

The taiko knot, shown as see-through, to let you see the obiage at the top, covering a makura pad, and the obijime at the centre. See below how to tie a taiko knot in a Nagoya obi and a fukuro obi.


Below is a video with a lesson in how to put on a maru or fukuro obi. These obi do not have the sash section already folded in half, you fold that section yourself and leave the rear knot section at full width.

You can also get pre-shaped, two part nagoya obi, which do away with all the time consuming, complicated tying, but look the same once on. If you visit this site's obi section, you can see all kinds of obis, including nagoya and pre-shaped, two part obis

The makura (pillow) she mentions is an obi bustle pad, which pads out the top of the rear knot and is hidden inside the knot, covered by an obiage. The obiage is a scarf like tie that goes around the top of the obi sash and is tied at the front, then partially tucked under the sash. Around the middle, to help hold the obi in place, is a cord called an obijime, also tied at the front.

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Tying women's hanhaba obi

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How to tie Yukata Obi in a Bunko-musubi

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How to put on a pre-tied Yukata Obi

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How to put on a women's Tskure Yukata Obi. Tsukure are pre-tied obis, usually in two parts.

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How to put on a women's Heko Yukata Obi. Heko is a soft, ultra casual obi

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How to put on a women's Hira Yukata Obi. A hira obi is a flat, thin obi

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How to put on a women's Yukata Kimono.

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How to put on men's kaku obi with a kanda knot.

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How to put on men's kaku obi with kaino kuchi knot.

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How to tie Tasuki (to hold kimono sleeves up out of the way).

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Adjusting women's kimono length the traditional way

You can drag this picture to your desktop if you want to keep a copy to look at when offline or to open and print later







Stitching To Correct Length

A plain kimono or one with an all-over pattern can easily be hemmed, although the Japanese never hem them. Just fold it up the required amount and loosely stitch it; you don't need to fold in the top edge, cut it or do anything complicated

You can also shorten it the traditional way, with the fold at the waist but with that fold actually stitched in place, so you don't have fold and tie it to length every time you put it on. The stitch line will be hidden by the obi/sash, so you just stitch it with big stitches that show on the outside. See the photos below for how that is done


Click the images below to see enlargements, which open in new windows, leaving this one open

   

   

   

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