Vintage & Antique Japanese Kimonos & Collectables





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*Antique Gosho Ningyo Obi *Antique Gosho Ningyo Obi
Item code: on201

Price: £265.00

Available: 1

Shipping:
UK: £3.95
Europe: £15.95
Rest of World: £18.95
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Japanese Vintage Nagoya Obi


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Select your world region on the Shopping Cart page. Mail/shipping insurance is REQUIRED FOR ALL ADDRESSES OUTSIDE UK and can be purchased on the Mail Insurance page. One insurance fee per package, with a maximum weight of 2 kilos. Note* Item's price does not include shipping or insurance. Insurance fee payment is optional only for UK addresses and is required for each package sent to addresses outside the UK. See Postage section of site.

Description:
  • Photos below.

  • OUTSIDE UK - all customers from outside the UK must purchase Mail Insurance (purchase one Mail Insurance for each package - a package can contain more than one purchased item, package maximum weight is 2 kilos).

  • A rare, antique Nagoya obi, in lovely silk satin, with embroidered gosho ningyo (Imperial dolls). I have included a photo or two obis formed into hanging displays to show what could be done with this obi (plus an obijime). The display obi is not included, it’s just for reference.

  • Silk


Type:
  • A Nagoya obi. Nagoya obis often have the sash part already folded to half depth, with the knot section at full width, making them easier to put on. Some you fold yourself. This style was invented about 100 years ago and is less heavy than a more formal fukuro or maru obi. Nagoya are usually tied in a taiko musubi (square style knot, named after the Taiko bridge, at the opening of which a few geisha wore it as a new style, after which it became very popular and has remained so ever since), though they can be tied in other knots. Nagoya obis are less formal than a fukuro or maru obis but more formal than hanhaba obis


Obi Information:
  • Obi should not be washed

  • More information about obis, including a link to tying instructions, can be found after the photos below

  • The Japanese take great pains to store their traditional garments with the utmost care, which is why they stay in such good condition. Some of my Japanese garments have large, white stitching (shitsuke) round the edges. The Japanese put these stitches in to keep the edges flat during long periods of storage, these stitches just get pulled out before wearing the garment


Condition:
Excellent.

Measurements approximately:
Obi are one-size-fits-all items
Rear knot section:
Width 30.5cm
Length 118cm
Sash section:
Width 15cm
Length 206cm
Weight approx 0.8kg

Photos:
Click each small image below to see an enlargement, which opens in a new window, leaving this one open


   

   

   

   

   

   


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Examples below (not the obi for sale in this listing)


Back and front views - notice the addition of an obiage round the top and an objime round the middle, which hold the obi sash and knot in place.


Below you can see some lovely ways to display obis. The ends have been bound into fan and bow shapes and laid across the front





See more examples of obi tying on my Kimono Info pages 5 and 10 and a Nagoya tying instruction video here (halfway down that page).


Obi Information:
  • The 4 main types of women’s obis are:
    Nagoya
    Fukuro
    Maru
    Hanhaba
    Nagoya obis usually have the sash section ready folded and they open out to full width at the tare (rear knot end section).
    Fukuro obis are not pre folded and require the sash section of their length to be folded in half when putting them on. Fukuro are also thicker and heavier than nagoya obis.
    Nagoya & Fukuro Most nagoya (if the repeat pattern type) and fukuro obis have the pattern only one side of the fabric and are plain on the inner side. They are also often rokutsu, which means only patterned along 60% of the length on the outside, the other 40% is plain and is hidden underneath when the obi is wound twice round the waist. Rokutsu are also usually patterned on only one side. One that is patterned along 100% of its length is called zentzu. Some Nagoya obis are hassun Nagoyas, that is, they have no stiffening core inside, making them a bit softer and easier to tie.
    Maru obis are the most formal ones and have the same pattern on both sides and are zentsu obis, that is, the pattern is along the entire length, even the hidden areas. They are particularly heavy and vastly expensive obis. Maru obis are rarely worn nowadays, usually reserved for brides. They are very vollectable, as they are becoming rarer, and offer a lot of fabric for remaking, as they are wider and patterned along their entire length on both sides
    Nagoya, fukuro and maru obis can be tied at the rear in a variety of musuba (knots) but the most popular and easiest is the taiko knot. For this and many other knots they require other items; a makura pad for inside the top of the knot, an obiage to help hold the knot in place and to cover the makura and hold it, and an obijime cord to tie around the centre of the sash and through the knot, to hold it in place. A fourth item is often used too, an obi mae ita (obi ita), which is a board that is slipped behind the front of the sash to keep it firm and avoid creasing as one moves.. The obijime cord is sometimes decorated with an obidome (a spcial obi ‘brooch’ the cord is threaded through) at the centre front. All these items are usually bought separately.
    Hanhaba obis are lightweight, informal obis and are usually tied in cho cho musuba (bow knots) and worn with casual yukata kimonos.
    2 Part obis have become popular with those short of time or skill at tying obis. They are most popular as 2 part hanhaba obis, for casual wear with kimonos like yukatas, or as 2 part Nagoya obis, with the knot section pre-shaped in the taiko knot style. There are also Fukurasuzume Pre-Tied Obis, which means sparrow knot, with a bow shape representing a sparrow. These are most often seen worn with furisode kimonos on special occasions. Some two part obis do not have the knot section pre shaped but it is still easier to fold into shape and position than if the sash section and knot section were all one, untied piece.
    Chuuya obi (sometimes spelled chuya) is no longer one of the main types of obi available, it is an obsolete type of obi, and now a collectable antique. Most often they are geisha’s obis. The chuuya obi is characterized by different reversible patterns in obverse and reverse. "chuuya" means daytime and night time; early chuuya had a black side and a patterned side, it is compared to dark night and bright day. Originally. chuuya-obis are used by Iki-Suji ladies in ancient Japan. Iki-Suji means a kind of kimono expert, such as a geisha.
    Obi rear knots, whether on pre-shaped, 2-part obis or one piece obis, the knots are are held in place using an obiage and an obijime and, if a taiko style knot, is also padded out at the top with an obi makura; all of these items are bought separately, although one can improvise with them. However, a makura is not required for a hanhaba obi nor for a pre shaped bow knot obi

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    NOTE* Postage prices are without additional, optional insurance, which can be purchased separately on the Postal Insurance pages. When you have finished selecting your purchases just choose the insurance cover for your country, that matches the total (purchase + postage) in your shopping basket. Insurance is optional but please note, no refund can be given if an item is lost in the post without insurance cover taken out. All UK destination mail is automatically covered up to a maximum of £36 per parcel.
    (See postage page for full details - links in the left side page menu)

    Additional Information
    One must bear in mind that most are vintage items, which I strive to describe accurately and honestly. A very few smell of mothballs or a touch of vintage mustiness, most do not. This can be aired out and this can be speeded up by tumble drying the dry garment at warm. I usually mention it in the listing if one does but one must bear it in mind as a possibility when buying vintage and antique items.
    Please be aware that different monitors display colour slightly differently, so colour in photos is purely a guideline, as I can't foresee how your monitor will display it. While I try to describe colour sometimes, a description often conjures up one colour to one person but may suggest a different colour to another, so, again, colour description is just a guide to colour.

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    wafuku - noun: traditional Japanese clothing

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